Sample pictures from Lowell Observatory (P. Tanga, W. Sheehan, K. Brausch, W. Burke, J. Roberts)

Very good transparency, but bad seeing and wind disturbing the observation. The aureole (V band, is seen first in correspondence of the pole of Venus, well before 1st contact.

Highly asymmetric afterwards.

observations.001.jpg

Credit : P. Tanga, Laboratoire Lagrange, Obs. de la Côte d'Azur; K. Brausch, J. Roberts at Lowell Observatotry; - Venus Twilight Experiment: P. Tanga, Th. Widemann, Observatoire de Paris/LESIA, CNRS, UPMC, Université Paris-Diderot.

VTeXLowell.png


Sample picture from Moondara Observatory, Mount Isa, Australia (F. Braga-Ribas, L. Fulham)

Observation at Venus egress, Felipe Braga Ribas and Len Fulham, Moondarra station, near Mount Isa, Australia (screen copy, VTE coronagraph with a Merlin-Raptor camera). The aureola remains strongly assymetrical between contacts 3 and 4. It is much more intense in the North pole region on Venus, and streaks across the chomosphere in this image taken with an I filter at 760 nm (bandwidth 10 nm).

Venu_aureola_Mt_Isa.jpg

Credit : Felipe Braga-Ribas, Observatoire de Paris/LESIA, Len Fulman, Moondarra Observatory / Mount Isa / Australia. - Venus Twilight Experiment: P. Tanga, Laboratoire Lagrange, Obs. de la Côte d'Azur ; Th. Widemann, Observatoire de Paris/LESIA, CNRS, UPMC, Université Paris-Diderot.


Sample pictures from Longyearbyen, Svalbard, Norway (J. Berthier, T. Widemann)

Observation at Venus egress, Jérôme Berthier and Thomas Widemann, Longyearbyen, Svalbard, Norway (screen copy, VTE coronagraph with a DMK-41 camera). The aureola remains visible and highly assymetrical after contact 4. It is much more intense in the North pole region on Venus, in this image taken with an I filter at 760 nm (bandwidth 10 nm).

venus_transit_fromSvalbard.png venus_egress_fromSvalbard_raw.png

Left : Image taken during the course of the transit. The photosphere is not saturated and shows granulation. On the left is the coronagraph's occulting disk momentarily moved away from the solar western limb to track Venus before the egress sequence. Right : immediately after fourth contact at 4:53 UT (6:53 CEDT). The refracted sunlight causing the aureole is mainly visible in the North polar region of Venus' atmosphere. Image in I band at 760 nm (bandwidth 10 nm).

Credit : Jérôme Berthier, Observatoire de Paris/IMCCE, and Thomas Widemann, Observatoire de Paris/LESIA. - Venus Twilight Experiment: P. Tanga, Laboratoire Lagrange, Obs. de la Côte d'Azur ; Th. Widemann, Observatoire de Paris/LESIA, CNRS, UPMC, Université Paris-Diderot.

Sample pictures from Haleakala, Maui, United States

ToV_arc_sample_RAW_annotated.jpg

Credit : Jay M. Pasachoff, Bryce A. Babcock, M. Lu (Williams College) and G. Schneider (Steward Observatory, University of Arizona); - Venus Twilight Experiment: P. Tanga (Laboratoire Lagrange, Obs. de la Côte d'Azur); Th. Widemann (Observatoire de Paris/LESIA, CNRS, UPMC, Université Paris-Diderot).
Topic attachments
I Attachment Action Size Date Who Comment
ToV_arc_sample_RAW_annotated.jpgjpg ToV_arc_sample_RAW_annotated.jpg manage 95 K 13 Jun 2012 - 08:42 ThomasWidemann  
Venu_aureola_MtIsa.pngpng Venu_aureola_MtIsa.png manage 164 K 09 Jun 2012 - 22:34 ThomasWidemann Observation egress, Len Fulham & Felipe Braga Ribas, Moondara
Venu_aureola_Mt_Isa.jpgjpg Venu_aureola_Mt_Isa.jpg manage 155 K 09 Jun 2012 - 22:47 ThomasWidemann Observation egress, Len Fulham & Felipe Braga Ribas, Moondara
venus_egress_fromSvalbard_raw.pngpng venus_egress_fromSvalbard_raw.png manage 53 K 06 Jun 2012 - 16:39 JenniferP  
venus_transit_fromSvalbard.pngpng venus_transit_fromSvalbard.png manage 287 K 06 Jun 2012 - 16:39 JenniferP  
Topic revision: r7 - 10 Jul 2012, PaoloTanga
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